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A Military Mission



Nanosyntex (NST) was founded in 2003 to support the needs of the U.S. military and polymer industries through product innovation.



Published July 10, 2006
Related Searches: nonwoven composite fleissner
Nanosyntex, Inc.
303 N. Fairmont Ave., Suite 201
Morristown, TN 37814
Phone: 423-587-2555
Fax: 423-587-2007
Email: vasanth@nanosyntex.com
Web: www.nanosyntex.comrn

The company was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Contract by the U.S. Marine Corps in January 2004 to demonstrate the feasibility of nonwoven-based combat utility uniform garments. NST also increased its commercial marketshare in the plastics compounding area in 2004 by selling process enhancing thermoplastic additive concentrates.

The success of the Phase I SBIR project enabled NST to secure a Phase II project with the U.S. Marines in November 2004. This project effort extended for two years with a six-month option for commercial transition. Total project funding amounted to $794,000.

Nanosyntex received another SBIR Phase I award from the U.S. Army in November 2005 for developing a high performance flame retardant (FR) garment. This project was completed in May 2006. Currently, NST has doubled its business in the area of additive masterbatches and is awaiting results on a Phase II award from the U.S. Army for developing high performance FR military coveralls/ garments.

In terms of technology, NST converts predominantly spunlaced nonwoven composite fabrics for the U.S. military. The end use applications are various camouflaged military uniforms, outdoor garments, protective gear, tents and other items. NST currently uses Aqua Jet spunlacing machines from German manufacturer Fleissner GmbH. “Many of the prototypes for our projects have been assembled at the pilot facilities of Fleissner and its clients,” explained Vasanth Narayanan, SBIR program manager. Additionally, NST adds proprietary chemical and mechanical finishing treatments to the multilayered spunlaced nonwoven composite fabrics to withstand the wear and tear of everyday military use.

Dr. Narayanan went on to say that innovation and product improvements have been the key to success for NST. “We have the opportunity to work with renowned scientists and technologists at premier military lab facilities such as the U.S. Soldier Systems Center in Natick, MA. We are currently working with the U.S. Marines and the U.S. Army to develop nano-scale based, durable FR treatments for woven and nonwoven fabrics,” he said. Additionally, efforts are underway to develop a uniform garment with integrated technologies to resistharmful chem-bio agents.

The patent-pending nonwoven composite fabrics developed by Nanosyntex for the U.S. military serve as a base platform for incorporating advanced functional materials for both military and civilian use. For the future, NST is committed to increasing its marketshare in the area of flame retardant and process enhancer additive concentrates for polymers, fibers and nonwoven fabrics. “Going forward, NST plans to use its proprietary durable, nano-scale based FR chemical finishing treatments for garment applications,” Dr. Narayanan concluded.